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BOOKS

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The Power of Pull: How Small Moves, Smartly Made, Can Set Big Things in Motion (Basic Books; April 2010) by John Hagel III, John Seely Brown, and Lang Davison

The Only Sustainable Edge: Why Business Strategy Depends On Productive Friction And Dynamic Specialization, John Hagel and John Seely Brown, Harvard Business School Press; May, 2005

Storytelling in Organizations : Why Storytelling Is Transforming 21st Century Organizations and Management, John Seely Brown, Stephen Denning, Katalina Groh, Laurence Prusak, Butterworth-Heinemann; August 2004

The Social Life of Information
,
John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, Harvard Business School Press, February 2000 (translated into nine languages).

Seeing Differently: Insights on Innovation, J.S. Brown (Ed.), Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Publishing, 1997.

Intelligent Tutoring Systems
, D. Sleeman and J.S. Brown (Eds.), London, England: Academic Press, Ltd., 1982.

Ergebnis Innovation: Die Velt mit anderen Augen sehen, John Seely Brown and Bolko v. Oetinger (Eds.), Munich, Germany: Carl Hanser Verlag, 1988.

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bweek
Innovation on the Edge

The Next Wave of Open Innovation April 08, 2009

Does the Experience Curve Matter Today? April 03, 2009

Peer-to-Patent: A System for Increasing Transparency March 18, 2009

How World of Warcraft Promotes Innovation January, 2009

Innovation for Hard Times
November 2008

How SAP Seeds Innovation
July 2008

Changing the World from the Edge (co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, May 2008

Institutional Innovations: A Silicon Valley nonprofit fostered the development of a radical open-source platform for top-level health research (co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, May 2008

Life on the Edge: Learning from Facebook (co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, April 2008

Learning from Tata's Nano (co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, February 2008

Catching the Innovation Wave (co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, January 2008)

Phoning from the Edge: What companies can learn from Google's efforts to reshape the U.S. mobile communications business (co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, January 2008

Embrace the Edge -- or Perish
(co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, November 2007

Funding Invention Vs. Managing Innovation (co-authored with John Hagel) BusinessWeek, February 2006

A Broader View of Offshoring
, (interview) BusinessWeek, May 2005

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WORKING PAPERS

Overview of Working Paper Series (PDF)
By John Hagel and John Seely Brown
This is probably the best place for a new reader to start before diving into individual Working Papers below. It places each of the Working Papers into a broader context and will help readers to navigate to find the Working Papers most appropriate for their needs.

The Agile Dance of Architectures – Reframing IT Enabled Business Opportunity (PDF)
By John Hagel and John Seely Brown
In contrast to the prevailing conventional wisdom that IT provides diminishing strategic advantage, we assert that quite the opposite is true: IT offers the potential of increasing strategic advantage. New strategic architectures and IT architectures are emerging and intersecting in ways that create significant business opportunity.  Senior managers must actively manage both of these architectures in order to overcome organizational inertia and create the institutional capability required to create strategic advantage.

Break On Through to the Other Side: A Missing Link in Redefining the Enterprise (PDF)
By John Hagel and John Seely Brown
Web services technology will have a subversive impact. Businesses will rapidly adopt the technology because of a very pragmatic near-term value proposition: with modest investment and relatively short lead-times it can generate tangible operating cost and asset savings. The emergence and evolution of a robust service grid will be key to accelerating adoption of the technology in mission critical business processes. Once adopted, the technology creates the potential for a powerful new growth platform that will ultimately redefine the enterprise and generate significant economic value for those who harness these growth platforms.

The Secret to Creating Value from Web Services Today: Start Simply (PDF)
By John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Dennis Layton-Rodin

How should businesses proceed to get the most economic value from Web services technology? The key is to start simply, proceed incrementally and learn from earlier initiatives.

Service Grids: The Missing Link in Web Services (PDF)
By John Hagel and John Seely Brown
This working paper focuses attention on a key missing link in Web services – the need for robust service grids consisting of diverse enabling services required to deliver mission critical functionality for application services. It makes the case that the emergence of service grids will be a key catalyst for broader adoption of Web services. The paper also speculates on possible trajectories for the emergence and evolution of service grids as well as implications for business value creation.

Some Security Considerations for Service Grids (PDF)
By Martin Milani and John Seely Brown
Executives appropriately express significant concerns about security as they proceed with the adoption of Web services. The technology will need to adopt much more robust security functionality to meet the needs of mission critical business processes. The good news is that Web services technology provides a foundation for a much more flexible and robust approach to security than previous generations of technology.

Control versus Trust: Mastering a Different Management Approach (PDF)
By John Hagel and John Seely Brown
Business management tends to focus on control to ensure results. Process manuals specify in detail the activities required. Management monitors activities at a granular level to anticipate potential problems. As companies find they must coordinate activities across multiple enterprises and provide more flexibility, these control approaches prove less helpful. Increasingly, management will need to master a different, trust-based approach. They will need to accelerate the building of trust and in particular become much more adept at the use of incentives to motivate appropriate action.

Orchestrating Business Processes - Harnessing the Value of Web Services Technology (PDF)
By John Hagel and John Seely Brown
Web services technology enables a much more flexible, loosely coupled technology architecture. To effectively create economic value from this technology, companies will need to develop very different management approaches. Today, we rely on hard-wired management approaches because that was all our technology allowed. Now, we have an opportunity to adopt a much more flexible, loosely coupled approach to business process management. Those who master this new approach will generate significant wealth.

Orchestrating Loosely Coupled Business Processes: The Secret to Successful Collaboration (PDF)
By John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Scott Durchslag
Business collaboration remains abstract and irrelevant unless it is firmly anchored in specific business processes. Coordination of business processes across multiple enterprises requires a different approach to business process management. Loosely coupled business processes require new orchestration skills.

 

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PAPERS, ARTICLES , CHAPTERS, PROCEEDINGS

Learning in/for a World of Constant Flux, with Douglas Thomas, University Research for Innovation, Economica, 2010

Foreword:  Education in the Creative Economy, by Daniel Araya, November 2009.

Foreword: Making Work Visible:  Ethnographically Grounded Cases of Studies of Work Practices, by Peggy Szymanski, October 2009.

Impedance Matching of Humans to Machines in High-Q Information Retrieval Systems, with Robert S. Bauer, Dan Brassil, Christopher Hogan, Gina Taranto, in the Proceedings of the 2009 IEEE International Conference on Systems, Man, and Cybernetics, San Antonio, Texas,
October 11-14, 2009.

Deep Listening, with Simon Chadwick, Research World, September 2009.

The Big Shift:  Measuring the Forces of Change, Harvard Business Review, July-August 2009.

Foreword: The Second Educational Revolution:  How Technology is Transforming Education Again, book by Allan Collins and Richard Halverson, January 2009.

Why Virtual Worlds Can Matter, with Douglas Thomas, International Journal of Media and Learning, Vol. 1, January 2009.

The Power of Dispositions, with Douglas Thomas, ACM Ubiquity,
Vol. 9, issue 43, December 2008.

Creation Nets:  Harnessing the Potential of Open Innovation, with John Hagel III, Journal of Service Science, Volume 1, Number 2 (2008)

How to Connect Technology and Passion in the Service of Learning,  The Chronicle of Higher Education. 17 October 2008.

Shaping Strategy in a World of Constant Disruption, with John Hagel III  and Lang Davison, Harvard Business Review, October 2008.

From Push to Pull:  Emerging Models For Mobilizing Resources, with John Hagel III, Journal of Social Service, Volume 1, number 1 (2008).

Are Gamers Born or Made?, with Douglas Thomas, Conversation Starter, Harvard Business School Press.com, 5 March 2008.

The Gamer Disposition, Special Breakthrough Ideas For 2008, Harvard Business Review, February 2008.

Minds on Fire, with Richard P. Adler, Educause Review,
January/February 2008.

From Transactional Markets to Relational Networks: Amplifying the Innovation Potential of High-Tech Regions, SPRIE, January 2008.

Keep It Simple, John Seely Brown, Receiver Magazine #18, June 2007.

A Short History of Learning, John Seely Brown and Estee Solomon Gray, Learning & Performance: An Anthology, 2007, edited by Prem Kumar, National Leadership Institute, Singapore and Phil Ramsey, Massey University, New Zealand.

The Play of Imagination:  Extending the Literary Mind, John Seely Brown and Douglas Thomas, Games and Culture, 2007 2:  149-172

From Transactional Markets to Relational Markets:  Amplifying the Innovation Potential of High Tech Regions, John Seely Brown and John Hagel III, High Tech Regions 2.0:  Sustainability & Reinvention, SPRIE, November 2006

Creation Nets:  Getting the Most From Open Innovation, John Seely Brown and John Hagel III, The McKinsey Quarterly, number 2, 2006.

MBAs be warned: The Gamers Are Learning More Than You Realize, John Seely Brown and Douglas Thomas, Wired Magazine, April 2006.

How Much Knowledge Should a Business Give Away, John Seely Brown and John Hagel III,
European Business Forum, Issue 24, Spring 2006.
 
Funding Invention vs. Managing Innovation, John Seely Brown and John Hagel III, Businessweek, February 16, 2006.

Connecting Globalization & Innovation:  Some Contrarian Perspectives, John Seely Brown and John Hagel III, Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum, January 25-30, 2006.

“From Tightly Bound to Loosely Coupled,” John Hagel and John Seely Brown, Software Development, September 2003, Vol. 11, No. 9; pp 39-47.

“Flexible IT, better strategy,” John Seely Brown and John Hagel, McKinsey Quarterly, 2003 Number 4, pp. 51-59.

Open Innovation, Henry Chesbrough, foreword by John Seely Brown, Harvard Business School Press, 2003.

“Research That Reinvents the Corporation,” John Seely Brown, Harvard Business Review on The Innovative Enterprise, 2003 Harvard Business School Publishing Corporation, pp. 129-154.

Service Grids: The Missing Layer in Web Services,” John Hagel and John Seely Brown. Release 1.0. EDventure Holdings, Inc., New York, NY, December 23, 2002, volume 20, no. 11, pp. 1-32.

“Local Knowledge: Innovation in the Networked Age,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, Management Learning, Vol. 33 (4); pp. 427-437. Sage Publications, 2002.

“Learning in the Digital Age,” John Seely Brown, in The Internet & the University: Forum 2001 edited by Maureen Devlin, Richard Larson and Joel Meyerson, pp. 65-91. Published as a joint project of the Forum for the Future of Higher Education and EDUCAUSE, 2002.

Out of the Box: Strategies for Achieving Profits Today and Growth Tomorrow through Web Services, John Hagel III, foreword by John Seely Brown, Harvard Business School Press, 2002.

The Social Life of Learning: How can Continuing Education be Reconfigured in the Future,” John Seely Brown, Continuing Higher Education Review, Vol. 66, 2002; pp. 50-69.

“Research That Reinvents the Corporation,” John Seely Brown, Harvard Business Review Special Issue, The Innovative Enterprise, August 2002, pp. 105-114.

“Learning in the Digital Age,” John Seely Brown, Forum Futures 2002, pp. 20-23.

“Loosening Up: How Process Networks Unlock the Power of Specialization,” John Seely Brown, Scott Durchslag and John Hagel III, McKinsey Quarterly, May 31, 2002, pp. 59-69.

“Convergence and co-evolution,” John Seely Brown, European Business Forum, Spring 2002, p.14.

“Go Slowly with Web Services,” John Hagel, John Seely Brown and Dennis Layton-Rodin, CIO, February 15, 2002, pp. 36-40.

“Bridging Epistemologies: the Generative Dance between Organizational Knowledge and Organizational Knowing,” S.D.N. Cook and J.S. Brown, in Managing Knowledge, edited by Stephen Little, Paul Quintas and Tim Ray, pp.68-101. Sage Publications, 2002.

“Organizing Knowledge,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, in Managing Knowledge, edited by Stephen Little, Paul Quintas and Tim Ray, pp.19-40. Sage Publications, 2002.

“Cut Loose From Old Business Processes,” John Hagel III and John Seely Brown, Optimize, December 2001, pp. 42-51.

Don’t Count Society Out,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, in The Invisible Future, edited by Peter J. Denning, pp. 117-144. McGraw-Hill, October 2001.

“Your Next IT Strategy,” John Hagel III and John Seely Brown, Harvard Business Review, October 2001, pp. 105-113.

Creativity Versus Structure: A Useful Tension,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, MIT Sloan Management Review, Vol. 42, No., 4, Summer 2001, pp. 93-94.

“Estrutura e Espontaneidade: Conhecimento e Organização, trans A. Brandão.” In M.T. Fleury & M. Oliveira, eds, Gestão, Estratégica do Conhecimento: Integrando Aprendizagem, Conhecimento e Compências, São Paulo, Brazil: Editora Atlas SA, 2001.

“Knowledge and Organization: A Social-Practice Perspective,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, Organization Science, Vol. 12, No. 2, March-April 2001, pp. 198-213.

“Don’t Count Society Out – A Response to Bill Joy,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, in Societal Implications of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology – NSET Workshop Report, edited by Mihail C. Roco and William Sims Bainbridge, 30-36. National Science Foundation, March 2001.

“Structure and Spontaneity: Knowledge and Organization,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, in Managing Industrial Knowledge, edited by Ikujiro Nonaka and David Teece, 44-67. Sage Publications, 2001.

“A Response to Bill Joy and the Doom-and-Gloom Technofuturists,” AAAS Science and Technology Policy Yearbook 2001, edited by Albert H. Teich, Stephen D. Nelson, Celia McEnaney and Stephen J. Lita, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 2001.

“Where Have All the Computers Gone?,” MIT Technology Review, John Seely Brown, January/February 2001, pp 86-87.

“Ecological Computing.” The Industry Standard, John Seely Brown and David Rejeski, 25 December 2000, pp 33-34.

look_c1osely_right_now: the internet bestows authority on everyone, which is exactly the problem,” Forbes ASAP, John Seely Brown, 2 October 2000, p. 26.

Practice vs. Process: The Tension that Won’t Go Away,” Knowledge Directions, John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, Spring 2000, Volume 2 Number 1 pp 86-96.

“Balancing Act: How to Capture Knowledge Without Killing It,” Harvard Business Review, John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, May-June, 2000 p.73-80.

“Re-Engineering the Future: A Response to Bill Joy and the doom-and-gloom technofuturists,” The Industry Standard, John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. 24 April 2000, p.196.

“Growing up Digital: The Web and a New Learning Ecology,” John Seely Brown, Change, March/April 2000, pp 10-20.

“Invention, Innovation, and Organization,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, working paper.

Mysteries of the Region: Knowledge Dynamics in Silicon Valley, John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid,” in The Silicon Valley Edge: A Habitat for Innovation and Entrepreneurship, edited by Chong-Moon Lee, 16-39. Stanford University Press, November 2000.

“Knowledge and Organization: A Social-Practice Perspective,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, working paper.

“Balancing Points: Structure, Spontaneity, and the New Document,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, working paper.

Understanding Silicon Valley: The Anatomy of an Entrepreneurial Region, Martin Kenney, ed., foreword by John Seely Brown, Stanford University Press, 2000.

Art and Innnovation – The Xerox PARC Artist-In-Residence Program, introduction by John Seely Brown, edited by Craig Harris, The MIT Press, 1999.

“The origins of ubiquitous computing research at PARC in the late 1980’s,” Mark Weiser, Rich Gold, and John Seely Brown, IBM Systems Journal, Vol.38, No.4, 1999; pp. 693-696.

“Bridging Epistemologies: The Generative Dance Between Organizational Knowledge and Organizational Knowing,” Scott D.N. Cook and John Seely Brown, Organization Science, Vol. 10, No. 4, July-August 1999; pp. 381-400.

“An Interview with John Seely Brown,” Lawrence M. Fisher, Strategy & Business, Fourth Quarter 1999, Issue 17; pp.86-95.

Future Talk: Conversations About Tomorrow, Larry King with Pat Piper, HarperCollins Publishers 1998; pp. 235-246.

“Conversation with John Seely Brown,” Knowledge Directions. Volume 1, Spring 1999; pp. 28-35.

“Sustaining the Ecology of Knowledge,” John Seely Brown, Leader to Leader. Spring 1999, Number 12; pp. 31-36.

Bringing Design to Software, (Japanese edition) Terry Winograd, Ed. ACM Press, 1998.

“Ergebnis Innovation: Die Welt mit anderen Augen sehen, ”John Seely Brown and Bolko v. Oetinger, Eds. Harvard Bei Hanser, 1998.

“Internet technology in support of the concept of ‘communities-of-practice’: the case of Xerox, John Seely Brown.” Accounting Management and Information Technologies. 8 (1998); pp. 227-236.

To Dream the Invisible Dream,” John Seely Brown. The Red Herring. July, 1998; pp. 17.

“Riding on a Sea of Calm,” Mark Weiser and John Seely Brown, World Link, January/February 1998; pp. 46-50.

Universities in the Digital Age,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. The Mirage of Continuity: Reconfiguring Academic Information Resources for the 21st Century. Edited by Brian L. Hawkins and Patricia Battin. Washington, D.C.: Council on Library and Information Resources, 1998; pp. 39-60.

“Research That Reinvents the Corporation,” John Seely Brown. Harvard Business Review on Knowledge Management. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press, 1998; pp. 153-180.

“Organizing Knowledge,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Web-Weaving: Intranets, extranets and strategic alliances. Edited by Peter Lloyd and Paula Boyle. Butterworth-Heinemann, 1998; pp. 29-46.

“Center and Periphery: Balancing the Bias of Digital Technology,” John Seely Brown and Mark Weiser. Blueprint to the Digital Economy: Creating Wealth in the Era of E-Business. Edited by Don Tapscott, Alex Lowy and David Ticoll. McGraw-Hill, 1998; pp. 317-335.

“Organizing Knowledge,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. California Management Review. Spring 1998, Vol. 40, No. 3; pp. 90-111.

“Seeing Differently: A Role for Pioneering Research,” John Seely Brown. Research Technology Management. May/June 1998, Vol. 41, No. 3; pp. 24-33.

“The Coming Age of Calm Technology,” Mark Weiser and John Seely Brown, In Beyond Calculation: The Next Fifty Years of Computing, Peter J. Denning and Robert M. Metcalfe, New York, Springer-Verlag 1997.

“…Like toilet paper tubes glued to eyeglasses,” discussions with John Seely Brown, Richard Adler, InfoWorld, October 1997.

“Seeing Differently: Rethinking Innovation,” John Seely Brown. Comtech: the Magazine of Innovation in Chemistry and Technology. Washington, DC: American Chemical Society, July 1997; pp. 12-18.

“Changing the Game of Corporate Research: Learning to Thrive in the Fog of Reality,” John Seely Brown.

“Technological Innovation.” Oversights and Foresights. Edited by Raghu Garud, Praveen Rattan Nayyar, and Zur Baruch Shapira. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 1997; pp. 95-110.

“Research That Reinvents the Corporation,” John Seely Brown. Managing Strategic Innovation and Change: A Collection of Readings. Edited by Michael L. Tushman and Philip Anderson. New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 1997; pp. 342-352.

“Can Organizations Afford Knowing? Or Why They Can’t Afford Not To!,” Scott Noam Cook and John Seely, paper December 1996.

“Changing the game of corporate research: Learning to thrive in the fog of reality,” John Seely Brown, Technological Innovation, Chapter 6.

“Designing Calm Technology.” Mark Weiser and John Seely Brown. The “100” Show: the eighteenth Annual of the American Center for Design. Edited by Therese Rutowski. New York, NY: Watson-Guptill Publications, 1996; pp. 159-163.

“Brainstorming the Future Perfect,” Paul Saffo, Stewart Brand, Larry Keeley, Mike Hawley, Peter Sealy, John Seely Brown. Technologies for the 21st Century. Volume 7 Scaling Up. Edited by Martin Greenberger. Council for Technology and the Individual, Santa Monica, CA, 1996; pp. 235-263.

“To Dream the Invisible Dream,” John Seely Brown. Communications of the ACM. August 1996, Vol. 39, No. 8; pp. 30

“Universities in the Digital Age,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Change. July/August 1996, Vol. 28, No. 4; pp. 10-19.

“Space for the Chattering Classes,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. THESis: The Times Higher Education Supplement- Multimedia Features. May 10, 1996; pp. iv-vi

Keeping it Simple,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Bringing Design to Software, Terry Winograd, editor with John Bennett, Laura De Young, and Bradley Hartfield. New York, NY: ACM Press, 1996; pp. 129-150.

“Leveraging Learning,” Susan Stucky and John Seely Brown. Across the Board - the Conference Board Magazine. New York, NY; Vol. XXXIII No. 3, March 1996, pp. 22-24.

“Organizational Learning and Communities-of-Practice: Toward a Unified View of Working, Learning, and Innovation,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Organizational Learning, Michael D. Cohen and Lee S. Sproull, editors. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA, 1996; pp. 58-82.

“Practice at the Periphery: A Reply to Steven Tripp,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Situated Learning Perspectives, Hillary McLellen, editor. Educational Technology Publications:Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1996; pp. 169-173.

Stolen Knowledge,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Situated Learning Perspectives, Hillary McLellen, editor. Educational Technology Publications:Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1996; pp. 47-56.

Situated Cognition and the Culture of Learning,” John Seely Brown, Allan Collins and Paul Duguid. Situated Learning Perspectives, Hillary McLellen, editor. Educational Technology Publications, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1996; pp. 19-44.

“The People are the Company,” John Seely Brown and Estee Solomon Gray. Fast Company. Boston, MA; Premier Issue 1995, pp.78-82.

The Social Life of Documents,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. Release 1.0. EDventure Holdings, New York, NY; October 11, 1995; pp. 1-18.

“I Contesti Sociali Dell’Apprendimento: Acquisire Conoscenze a Scuola, Nel Lavoro, Nella Vita Quotidiana; A cura di Clotilde Pontecorvo,” Anna Maria Ajello, Cristina Zucchermaglio; Milano, Italy: LED - Edizioni Universitarie di Lettre Economia Diritto, 1995; pp. 327-357

“Organizational Learning and Communities of Practice: toward a unified view of working, learning and innovation,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid. New Thinking in Organizational Behavior, Hardimos Tsoukas, ed. London: Butterworth Heineman, 1994; pp. 165-187.

“Toward Informed Participation: Six Scenarios in Search of Democracy in the Information Age,” John Seely Brown, Paul Duguid and Susan Haviland. The Aspen Institute Quarterly, The Aspen Institute, Inc., Autumn 1994.

“Situated Cognition,” Paul Duguid and John Seely Brown. Perspectives on Situated Learning, Educational Technology; spring 1994.

Borderline Issues: Social and Material Aspects of Design,” J.S. Brown and P. Duguid, Human-Computer Interaction, v 9, n 1 (pp. 3-36) 1994.

“Rethinking the Border in Design: An Exploration of Central and Peripheral Relations in Practice,” Paul Duguid and John Seely Brown. The Edge of the Millennium, Whitney Library of Design Publishers, and imprint of Watson-Guptill, Dec 1993.

Keeping It Simple: Investigating Resources in the Periphery,” J.S. Brown and P. Duguid, Nov 1993.

“When Change is Constant,” John Seely Brown. Learning in Organizations, edited by Mary M. Crossan, Henry W. Lane, James C. Rush, Roderick E. White. Western Business School - The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada, 1993; pp.89-99. (Learning Organizations Workshop, June 21-23, 1992)

“Toward Informed Participation: Six Scenarios in Search of Democracy in the Electronic Age,” J.S. Brown, P. Duguid, S. Haviland, Oct 1993, Aspen Institute Forum Report: The Promise and Perils of Emerging Information Technologies, C. Firestone and D. Bollier, 1993.

“Rethinking The Border in Design: An Exploration of Central and Peripheral Relations in Practice,” J.S. Brown and P. Duguid, Extended version of Cooper Hewitt symposium, The Edge of the Millennium, Nov 1993.

“Reenacting the Corporation,” J.S. Brown and E. Walton, Planning Review, (pp 5-8), Sept/Oct 1993.

Stolen Knowledge,” J.S. Brown and P. Duguid, Educational Technology Journal, Special Issue on Situated Learning in Focus, Vol. 33, No. 3, Mar 1993; pp. 10-15.

“Model-based Diagnosis in SOPHIE III,” Johan de Kleer and John Seely Brown. Readings in Model-based Diagnosis, Hamscher, Walter; Console, Luca; de Kleer, Johan, (Eds.). San Mateo: Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, 1992; pp. 179 - 205.

“Stolen Knowledge,” J.S. Brown and P. Duguid, Educational Technology Journal, Nov 1992.

“Enacting Design for the Workplace,” John Seely Brown and Paul Duguid, in Usability: Turning Technologies into Tools, edited by Paul S. Adler and Terry A. Winograd, 164-197. Oxford University Press, 1992.

“Reflections on the Document,” John Seely Brown, Xploration, The Journal of Electronic Document Systems, Spring 1992.

Organizational Learning and Communities-of-Practice: Toward A Unified View of Working, Learning, and Innovation,” J.S. Brown and P. Duguid, Organization Science, Vol. 2, 40-57, 1991.

“Research that Reinvents the Corporation,” J.S. Brown, Harvard Business Review, January - February 1991, Harvard Business School, Boston, Massachusetts.

“High-performance Work Systems for the 1990s,” J.S. Brown, Benchmark, Vol. 6, 3 (pp 8-11), El Segundo, CA: Xerox Corporation, 1989.

“Innovation in the Workplace: a perspective on organizational learning,” J.S. Brown and P. Duguid, prepared for the CMU Conference on Organizational Learning in May 1989, in press. Also, IRL working paper.

“Towards a New Epistemology for Learning,” J.S. Brown in C. Frasson and J. Gauthiar (Eds.), Intelligent Tutoring Systems at the Crossroads of Artificial Intelligence and Education, Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing, 1989.

“Situated Cognition and the Culture of Learning,” J.S. Brown, A. Collins, and P. Duguid, Educational Researcher, Vol. 18, 01 (pp 32-41), Washington, DC: American Educational Research Association, 1989.

“Toward Portable Ideas,” M. Stefik and J.S. Brown in M.H. Olson (Ed.), Technological Support for Work Group Collaboration, (pp 147-165), Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1989.

“Cognitive Apprenticeship: teaching the craft of reading, writing, and mathematics,” A. Collins, J.S. Brown and S.E. Newman in L.B. Resnick (Ed.), Knowing, Learning, and Instruction: Essays in Honor of Robert Glaser, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, in press, 1989.

“The Computer as a Tool for Learning Through Reflection,” A. Collins and J.S. Brown in H. Mandl and A. Lesgold (Eds.), Learning Issues for Intelligent Tutoring Systems, New York, NY: Springer, 1988.

“A Framework for the Cognitive Apprenticeship,” A. Collins, J.S. Brown, S.E. Newman, IMPACT on instructional improvement, Vol. 22, 02 (pp.33-39), A Publication of the New York State Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, New York: 1987.

“I Contesti Sociali Dell’Apprendimento: Acquisire conoscenze a scuola, nel lavoro, nella vita quotidiana.” A cura di: Clotilde Pontecorvo, Anna Maria Ajello, Cristina Zucchermaglio; Milano, Italy: LED Edizioni Universitarie di Lettre Economia Diritto, 1995; pp. 181-231.

“Reactive Learning Environments for Teaching Electronic Troubleshooting, J.S. Brown and R.R. Burton in W.B. Rouse (Ed.), Advances in Man-Machine Systems Research, Vol. 3 (pp 65-98), Greenwich, CT: JAI Press Inc., 1987.

“Theories of Causal Ordering,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown, Artificial Intelligence, Vol. 29 (pp 33-61), North-Holland, 1986.

“Issues in Cognitive and Social Ergonomics: From Our House to Bauhaus,” J.S. Brown and S.E. Newman, Human-Computer Interaction, Vol. 1 (pp 359-391), Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Hillsdale, NJ, 1985.

“From Cognitive to Social Ergonomics and Beyond,” J.S. Brown in D.A. Norman and S.W. Draper (Eds.), User-Centered System Design: New Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., Hillsdale, NJ, 1986.

“AI: Windows of Opportunity in Office Automation,” J.S. Brown and G. Moskovitz, in press.

“A Qualitative Physics Based On Confluences,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown in D.G. Bobrow (Ed.), Qualitative Reasoning About Physical Systems, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1985.

“Process versus Product: A Perspective on Tools for Communal and Informal Electronic Learning,” J.S. Brown in M. Chen and W. Paisley (Eds.), Children and Microcomputers; Research on the Newest Medium, Beverly Hills, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 1985.

“Information Technology in Precollege Education,” J.S. Brown and J. G. Green (Co-chairmen) as “The Reports of the Research Briefings Panels-1984” (pp. 298-317) appeared in New Pathways in Science and Technology, New York: Vintage Books, 1985.

“Idea-Amplifiers---New Kinds of Electronic Learning,” J.S. Brown, Educational Horizons, Vol. 63, No. 3, 1985.

“Process versus Product: A Perspective on Tools for Communal and Informal Electronic Learning,” J.S. Brown, Educational Computing Research, Vol. 1(2), 1985.

“Why AM and EURISKO Appear to Work,” D. B. Lenat and J.S. Brown, Artificial Intelligence 23 (pp. 269-294), North-Holland, 1984.

“The Low Road, the Middle Road, and the High Road,” J.S. Brown in P. H. Winston and K. A. Prendergast (Eds.), The AI Business: Commercial Prospects of Artificial Intelligence, The MIT Press, 1984.

“Competitive Argumentation in Computational Theories of Cognition,” K. VanLehn, J.S. Brown and J. G. Greeno in W. Kintsch, J. R. Miller and P. G. Polson (Eds.), Methods and Tactics in Cognitive Science, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1984. (Also ONR Technical Report, December 1982 and CIS-14 Technical Report Xerox Palo Alto Research Center.)

“Skiing as a Model of Instruction,” R. R. Burton, J.S. Brown and G. Fischer in B. Rogoff and J. Lave (Eds.), Everyday Cognition: Its Development in Social Context, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984.

“Report of the Research Briefings Panel on Information Technology in Precollege Education,” J.S. Brown and J.G. Greeno (Co-chairmen) in Research Briefings 1984, Washington, DC: National Academy of Sciences, 1984. (also published in 1985.)

“A Qualitative Physics Based on Confluences,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown, Artificial Intelligence 24 (pp. 7-83), North-Holland, 1984.

“The Origin, Form and Logic of Qualitative Physical Laws,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown in Proceedings of the Eighth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Karlsruhe, West Germany, August 8 - 12, 1983.

“Process versus Product - A Perspective on Tools for Communal and Informal Electronic Learning,” J.S. Brown in S. Newman and E. Poor (Eds.), Report From The Learning Lab: Education in the Electronic Age, New York, New York: WNET, 1983.

“Learning-by-Doing Revisited for Electronic Learning Environments,” J.S. Brown in M.A. White (Ed.), The Future of Electronic Learning, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1983.

“Assumptions and Ambiguities in Mechanistic Mental Models,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown in D. Gentner and A.S. Stevens (Eds.), Mental Models, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1983.

“Foundations of Envisioning,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown in Proceedings of the AAAI-82 National Conference on Artificial Intelligence, Pittsburgh, PA, August 18-20, 1982.

“An Investigation of Computer Coaching for Informal Learning Activities,” R.R. Burton and J.S. Brown in D. Sleeman and J.S. Brown (Eds.), Intelligent Tutoring Systems, London, England: Academic Press, 1982.

“Towards a Generative Theory of Bugs,” J.S. Brown and K. VanLehn in T. Carpenter, J. Moser, T. Romberg, and (Eds.), Addition and Subtraction: A Cognitive Perspective, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1982.

“Pedagogical, Natural Language and Knowledge Engineering Techniques in Sophie I, II, and III,” J.S. Brown, R.R. Burton and J. de Kleer in D. Sleeman and J.S. Brown (Eds.), Intelligent Tutoring Systems, London, England: Academic Press, 1982.

“Mental Models of Physical Mechanisms and Their Acquisition,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown in J.R. Anderson (Ed.), Cognitive Skills and Their Acquisition, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1981.

“Towards a Theory of Qualitative Reasoning About Mechanisms,” J. de Kleer and J.S. Brown in J. Rasmussen and W.B. Rouse (Eds.), Human Detection and Diagnosis of System Failures, New York: Plenum Press, 1981.

“Repair Theory: A Generative Theory of Bugs in Procedural Skills,” J.S. Brown, K. VanLehn, Cognitive Science 4, Vol. 4, 1980.

“Planning Nets: A Representation for Formalizing Analogies and Semantic Models of Procedural Skills,” K. VanLehn and J.S. Brown, in R.E. Snow, P.A. Frederico, and W.E. Montague (Eds.), Aptitude Learning and Instruction Volume 2: Cognitive Process Analyses of Learning and Problem Solving, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1980.

“Inference in Text Understanding,” A.M. Collins, J.S. Brown, K.M. Larkin, in R.J. Spiro, B.C. Bruce, and W.F. Brewer (Eds.), Theoretical Issues in Reading Comprehension, Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc., 1980.

“An Investigation of Computer Coaching for Informal Learning Activities,” R.R. Burton and J.S. Brown, International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, Vol. 11, January 1979.

“Toward a Natural-language Capability for Computer Assisted Instruction,” R.R. Burton and J.S. Brown, Procedures for Instructional Systems Development, Academic Press, 1979.

“The Computer as a Personal Assistant for Learning,” J.S. Brown and I.P. Goldstein in J. Lochhead and J. Clement (Eds.), Cognitive Process Instruction, Philadelphia, PA: The Franklin Institute Press, 1979.

“Aspects of a Theory of Simplification, Debugging, and Coaching,” G. Fischer, J.S. Brown and R.R. Burton, Proceedings of the Second National Conference of the Canadian Society for Computing, 1978.

“Diagnostic Models for Procedural Bugs in Basic Mathematical Skills,” J.S. Brown, R.R. Burton, Cognitive Science, 2 (2), 1978.

“Artificial Intelligence and Learning Strategies,” J.S. Brown, A. Collins, G. Harris, in H.F. O’Neil, Jr. (Ed.), Learning Strategies, New York: Academic Press Inc., 1978.

“A Paradigmatic Example of an Artificially Intelligent Instructional System,” J.S. Brown, R. Burton, International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, Vol. 10, 1978.

“Computers in a Learning Society,” J.S. Brown, I.P. Goldstein, Testimony for the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Domestic and International Planning, Analysis, and Cooperation, October 1977.

“Representing and Using Procedural Bugs for Educational Purposes,” J.S. Brown, R. Burton, C. Hausmann, Proceedings of National Association for Computing Machinery, October 1977.

“Some Comments on Building Habitable Knowledge-Based Systems,” J.S. Brown, Proceedings of the Fifth International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, August 1977.

“Uses of Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Computer Technology in Education,” J.S. Brown in R.J. Seidel, M.L. Rubin (Eds), Computers and Communications: Implications for Education, New York: Academic Press, Inc., 1977.

“A Tutoring and Student Modeling Paradigm for Gaming Environments,” R. Burton and J.S. Brown, Proceedings for the Symposium on Computer Science and Education, Anaheim, CA, February 1976.

“Systematic Understanding: Synthesis, Analysis and Contingent Knowledge in Specialized Understanding Systems,” R.J. Bobrow and J.S. Brown, in D.G. Bobrow and A.M. Collins (Eds.), Representation & Understanding: Studies in Cognitive Science, New York: Academic Press, 1975.

“A Computerized Scoring System for Use with Content Analysis Scales,” L.A. Gottschalk, C. Hausmann, J.S. Brown, Comprehensive Psychiatry, Vol. 16, No. 1, Jan./Feb. 1975. (Also appeared as a chapter in L.A. Gottschalk (Ed.), The Content Analysis of Verbal Behavior: Further Studies, New York: Spectrum Publications, Inc. 1979.)

“Multiple Representations of Knowledge for Tutorial Reasoning,” J.S. Brown, R. Burton, in D.G. Bobrow and A.M. Collins (Eds.), Representation & Understanding: Studies in Cognitive Science, New York: Academic Press, 1975.

“SOPHIE: A Step Toward Creating a Reactive Learning Environment,” J.S. Brown, R. Burton, A. Bell, International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, Vol. 7, 1975.

“Pragmatic Uses of Artificial Intelligence in CAI,” J.S. Brown, R. Burton, Proceedings of National Association for Computing Machinery, Nov. 1974.

“A Model-Driven Question Answering System for Mixed-initiative Computer Assisted Instruction,” J.S. Brown, R.R. Burton and F. Zdybel, Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers, Transactions on Systems, Man and Cybernetics, SMC-3, May 1973.

“Steps Toward Automatic Theory Formation,” J.S. Brown, Proceedings of the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, 1973.

“Quasi-formal Models of Inductive Behavior and Their Relation to Piaget’s Theory of Cognitive Stages,” J.W. Gyr, J.S. Brown, and A.C. Cafagna, Psychological Review, Vol. 74, 272-290, 1967.

“Computer Simulation and Psychological Theories of Perception,” J.W. Gyr, J.S. Brown, R. Willey and A. Zivian, Psychological Bulletin, Vol. 65, 174-192, 1966.

“Computer Simulation of Perceptual Motor Skills,” J.W. Gyr, W. Ash, J.S. Brown, R. Willey and A. Zivian, Perceptual Motor Skills, Vol. 23, 793-794, 1966.

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